Mechanics’ liens could be an option if you wish to attempt to secure payment for work that you have done, such as construction, technical work or subcontracting. There are also other possibilities that could be more appropriate, depending on the circumstances.

Generally speaking, filing a lien document attaches your claim to the deed of the property on which you worked. When the property goes to market, the participants in the sale would probably have to settle your interest before they completed their transaction.

Who qualifies as a mechanic

While you may not think of it this way, Connecticut law could see you as a mechanic if you are a skilled craftsperson operating with tools or machinery. By this definition, you might qualify to file a mechanic’s lien if you are a:

  • Plumber
  • Electrician
  • HVAC tech
  • Construction professional

What a lien does

A lien — or the ability to file one — should give you some amount of security when it comes to ensuring payment for your work. Besides the direct power of this option, the idea is that, if you have the ability to attach this type of enforceable IOU to a deed, then property owners are more likely to pay you outright.

What a lien would typically not do is allow you to receive payment for a job you did not complete. For partial jobs, you may have to pursue other options.

How much liens are worth

In general, your lien would be worth the same amount as the value you added to the property. This seems straightforward, but certain types of work could be more complicated than others in this regard. You would probably want to look at this item in particular on a case-by-case basis.